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Pairing specific wines with certain foods or dishes is not a random wine buff invention, it is actually based on science.

And it can actually improve your experience of a meal. And while the old rule of ‘white for white’ and ‘red for red’ has some truth to it, you should look to break free of this convention. Generally speaking acidic white wines pair well with lighter meats, and heavier reds help to break through fatty foods. In terms of dishes, try to work out what the dominant taste is - salty, acid, sweet or fatty - and pair your wine accordingly. Start out by trying these general food wine pairings:

  • Big bodied reds (Cabernet, Shiraz) pair well with red meats, hard cheeses and smoked meats
  • Medium bodied reds (Merlot) pair well with red meats, white meats and hard cheeses
  • Light bodied reds (Pinot Noir) pair well with fish, white meat and vegetables
  • Light dry whites (Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Grigio) pair well with fish, vegetables and bread
  • Sweet whites (Riesling, Chenin Blanc) pair well with soft and hard cheeses, and sweet desserts
  • Heavy whites (Chardonnay) pair well with vegetables, breads, rich fish and white meat
  • Sparkling wines (Champagne, Cuvee) pair well with fish, cheeses and canapes

At the end of the day you should drink what you like, but the more you experiment with wine/food pairings the more confident you will become.

Mocktail for the month: Rose Berry Bliss Now that Spring has sprung, why not get in the mood with a glass of alcohol-free bubbly berry bliss?

  1. Pour a bottle of Edenvale Rosé into a large jug
  2. Add 250g frozen blueberries
  3. Add 1 litre pink lemonade
  4. Place in fridge for 1 hour
  5. Pour into flutes and top up with lemon-lime soda and a few blueberries

Enjoy!

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